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Generation ROC: West Irondequoit students learn from local veterans

todayApril 4, 2024 5

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IRONDEQUOIT, N.Y. (WROC) — Connecting this generation’s young leaders with leaders in armed service is the goal behind “Irondequoit Remembers: A Living History Program.” The second annual event at Irondequoit High School brought the teens to take class from local veterans about their military careers, their trials, tribulations, and triumphs.

“You don’t get to experience everything he’s experienced and, like, I don’t know–I feel like I want to travel a lot when I’m older, so the fact that he was able to do that was very interesting to me,” says senior student Serah Hall.

These participants come from the advanced history and economics classes—110 students and 42 veterans in all. The students say it’s fascinating getting some real-world perspective on the events they learn about in class.

“We learned a lot about how [during the Korean War] the U.S. lines were pushing kind of farther and farther into China and how it was kind of discombobulated. To just have somebody who was actually there experiencing it and then being able to see his actual opinions on everything that was happening was really cool,” says sophomore Gabi Marshall.

The veterans happy to share their stories too with eager young ears. Army 1st Sergeant Bing Crosby Reaves, Sr. says even though it was daunting being drafted for Vietnam, he wanted to share the patriotism he and his comrades felt.

“It was not all about war. It meant a lot to be able to defend your country and to help other countries defend themselves for a democracy that we all believed in,” says 1st Sgt. Reaves.

“I hope he understands how much we truly care and how much he really did for our country and all the people around. That they really know that us students, we care, and we want to learn about stuff like this,” says Marshall.

In the end, the students say they walked away with some perspective as well as life lessons.

“The one thing that he told us that really stuck with me is that life changes a lot, and there’s going to be a lot of different circumstances in your life so you just gotta go with the flow, basically,” explains Hall. “I think that’s really important, because in life, you know, there’s going to be a lot of ups and downs, but you’ve just gotta keep going with it and, you know, whatever happens is going to be the right thing for you in the end.”

​ IRONDEQUOIT, N.Y. (WROC) — Connecting this generation’s young leaders with leaders in armed service is the goal behind “Irondequoit Remembers: A Living History Program.” The second annual event at Irondequoit High School brought the teens to take class from local veterans about their military careers, their trials, tribulations, and triumphs.

“You don’t get to experience everything he’s experienced and, like, I don’t know–I feel like I want to travel a lot when I’m older, so the fact that he was able to do that was very interesting to me,” says senior student Serah Hall.

These participants come from the advanced history and economics classes—110 students and 42 veterans in all. The students say it’s fascinating getting some real-world perspective on the events they learn about in class.

“We learned a lot about how [during the Korean War] the U.S. lines were pushing kind of farther and farther into China and how it was kind of discombobulated. To just have somebody who was actually there experiencing it and then being able to see his actual opinions on everything that was happening was really cool,” says sophomore Gabi Marshall.

The veterans happy to share their stories too with eager young ears. Army 1st Sergeant Bing Crosby Reaves, Sr. says even though it was daunting being drafted for Vietnam, he wanted to share the patriotism he and his comrades felt.

“It was not all about war. It meant a lot to be able to defend your country and to help other countries defend themselves for a democracy that we all believed in,” says 1st Sgt. Reaves.

“I hope he understands how much we truly care and how much he really did for our country and all the people around. That they really know that us students, we care, and we want to learn about stuff like this,” says Marshall.

In the end, the students say they walked away with some perspective as well as life lessons.

“The one thing that he told us that really stuck with me is that life changes a lot, and there’s going to be a lot of different circumstances in your life so you just gotta go with the flow, basically,” explains Hall. “I think that’s really important, because in life, you know, there’s going to be a lot of ups and downs, but you’ve just gotta keep going with it and, you know, whatever happens is going to be the right thing for you in the end.” Read More Generation ROCRochesterFirst  

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