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These two proposed NYS bills could change the way teens use social media

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ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WROC) — Wednesday on Capitol Hill, CEOs of some of social media’s biggest companies faced what some are calling a bipartisan grilling during a Senate hearing that discussed protecting children online.

Meta, TikTok and other social media CEOs testify in heated Senate hearing on child exploitation

In New York, two bills introduced back in October are still sitting in the State Senate’s Committee.

It wasn’t too long ago when you could open Instagram and YouTube and only see content from users you follow mixed with popular content. That’s just one of things being proposed as we see children and teens spending too much time online.

“I don’t think that we are aware of the extent to which AI is driving the content that we actually see in our news feeds and in anywhere in social media, even advertising,” Director for the Mount Hope Center Dr. Jennie Noll told News 8.

It’s a topic we’ve seen continue to develop, teens and tweens spending too much time scrolling social media.

New York lawmakers are trying to tackle the addictive craze with two bills that are stuck in Committee.

One bill, the Stop Addictive Feeds Exploitation (SAFE) for Kids Act – would require social media companies to restrict features on their platforms that have the potential to harm younger users.

Dr. Noll says this act could help.

“This gives parents some control over the timeframes in which content can be sent to their kids and targeted to their kids,” Dr. Noll said.

Currently, social media companies provide additional content to users by using algorithms that provide content on a variety of platforms.

The legislation would ban this method from various social medias to anyone under the age of 18 without parental consent, as well as prohibit platforms from sending notifications to minors between midnight and 6 a.m.

“This has the potential to mitigate some of the worries that we have about how much time kids are spending on the internet and how much of their addictive behavior can be associated with or controlled by the AI algorithms,” Dr. Noll said.

The New York Child Data Protection Act wants to prohibit online websites from collecting, using, sharing, or selling personal data from anyone for purposes of advertising from anyone under the age of 18.       

Dr. Noll says even if both bills end up passing —

“The bottom line still will be that parents still will have to monitor what their kids are doing,” Dr Noll said. “They’ll have to have conversations with their kids about social media, they’ll have to regulate their kids time on social media.”

According to the New York Senate website, as of January 3, both bills has been referred to Internet and Technology.

​ ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WROC) — Wednesday on Capitol Hill, CEOs of some of social media’s biggest companies faced what some are calling a bipartisan grilling during a Senate hearing that discussed protecting children online.
Meta, TikTok and other social media CEOs testify in heated Senate hearing on child exploitation
In New York, two bills introduced back in October are still sitting in the State Senate’s Committee.

It wasn’t too long ago when you could open Instagram and YouTube and only see content from users you follow mixed with popular content. That’s just one of things being proposed as we see children and teens spending too much time online.

“I don’t think that we are aware of the extent to which AI is driving the content that we actually see in our news feeds and in anywhere in social media, even advertising,” Director for the Mount Hope Center Dr. Jennie Noll told News 8.

It’s a topic we’ve seen continue to develop, teens and tweens spending too much time scrolling social media.

New York lawmakers are trying to tackle the addictive craze with two bills that are stuck in Committee.

One bill, the Stop Addictive Feeds Exploitation (SAFE) for Kids Act – would require social media companies to restrict features on their platforms that have the potential to harm younger users.

Dr. Noll says this act could help.

“This gives parents some control over the timeframes in which content can be sent to their kids and targeted to their kids,” Dr. Noll said.

Currently, social media companies provide additional content to users by using algorithms that provide content on a variety of platforms.

The legislation would ban this method from various social medias to anyone under the age of 18 without parental consent, as well as prohibit platforms from sending notifications to minors between midnight and 6 a.m.

“This has the potential to mitigate some of the worries that we have about how much time kids are spending on the internet and how much of their addictive behavior can be associated with or controlled by the AI algorithms,” Dr. Noll said.

The New York Child Data Protection Act wants to prohibit online websites from collecting, using, sharing, or selling personal data from anyone for purposes of advertising from anyone under the age of 18.       

Dr. Noll says even if both bills end up passing —

“The bottom line still will be that parents still will have to monitor what their kids are doing,” Dr Noll said. “They’ll have to have conversations with their kids about social media, they’ll have to regulate their kids time on social media.”

According to the New York Senate website, as of January 3, both bills has been referred to Internet and Technology. Read More Local NewsRochesterFirst  

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